3 steps to *actually* make a habit change

 

We all know habit change is hard, but we often forget about 2 critical steps in the process. Read below to make sure you’re not forgetting these important steps.

 

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

 

In the car last week, it truly struck me. Changing a habit or thought pattern is not a 1-step process. It’s actually 3.

 

How many times have you been told that snacking at night is hindering your weight loss? Or have you been told that short bursts of high intensity exercise are truly good for you? Or that sleeping more will make a huge difference in your health?

 

And yet, it’s pretty hard to put all of those pieces of advice into practice.

 

That’s what I was thinking about this week. There’s a big difference between:

  1. Intellectually knowing something
  2. Emotionally internalizing it
  3. Actually acting on it.

 

And to not acknowledge these three steps is a disservice to yourself. Because when we think that we should hear something and immediately be able to put it into action…we get frustrated or sad when or if we don’t succeed.

 

So three steps. How do we move from hearing something and “knowing” it to actually doing it? This is where emotionally internalizing it comes into play.

 

So how do you emotionally internalize new knowledge?

 

Take out a journal, a piece of paper, or a fresh word document and answer these questions:

  1. What did I learn?
  2. What did I believe before I knew this knowledge?
  3. What do I believe now that I know this knowledge?
  4. How would my life change if I implemented this knowledge?

Answering these questions help you understand how important this new knowledge is. Instead of equally weighting the importance of every piece of advice you hear, you can decide – how does this knowledge change my worldview? How does this impact my life today and in the future?

 

What it ultimately does is help you decide which pieces of knowledge you actually want to implement into your life, and what impact you think it will have on you.

 

The next piece is putting it into action.

 

Once you’ve decided that this new knowledge is important to you, it’s time to put it into practice. Get back out that word document, and ask yourself:

  1. What would putting this knowledge into practice look like for me?
  2. What would get in the way of putting this knowledge into practice?
  3. How can I stay accountable to this new knowledge?
  4. What preparation steps do I need to take in order to put this knowledge into practice?

 

What these questions do is allow you to get practical. You figure out what you want to do, what’s standing in your way, and how you keep yourself on track. This is what makes sure you remember this new knowledge and put it into practice.

 

This week’s assignment:

What’s a piece of advice you’ve heard recently that you haven’t been able to put into practice yet? Answer the questions from this post, and decide your course of action. Share in the comments below or with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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The Luxury of Mindfulness

Is mindfulness a luxury? Should self-realization be a priority when there’s so much sadness in the world? Let’s talk.

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

A few weeks ago I led a conversation with Innovators Box about mindfulness. One of the participants comments is still on my brain.

 

She said that with all of the trouble and difficulty in the world – mindfulness is a privilege. We are privileged to not have to worry about the source of our next meal or shelter. We get to worry about happiness and living our best life.

 

For some people, this statement induces guilt. Who are we to worry about mindfulness? Shouldn’t our energy go towards helping those in need? Or eradicating the hunger, and then we can all worry about mindfulness?

 

I understand this sentiment. I’m lucky to spend as much time and energy as I do thinking about my own happiness. I’m fortunate that the things which cause me stress are minuscule compared to what many people are dealing with.

 

However, I also don’t think this should be a cause for guilt or shame. Self-care and mindfulness is a privilege, and it’s also a responsibility.

 

I have the luxury of thinking about how to live my best life. That also means I have the luxury to think about how others can live their best lives too. If I was trying to solve world hunger without first putting my own brain and emotional state in the right place, I’d be hard pressed to find creative, effective solutions.

 

If I’m going to be the best problem-solver, friend, coach, and leader, I need to be in the best place physically and mentally possible.

 

I keep coming back to the same quote: “put on your mask on before assisting others.”

 

Self-care, mindfulness, meditation, yoga…these are not selfish acts. They are gifts to those around you.

 

It’s a privilege, and it’s a responsibility. With our recent Thanksgiving holiday, we get to think of all of the things we’re grateful for. Let’s take this gratitude and act on it – let’s truly treat ourselves so incredibly well, so that we can give our best to others.

 

This week’s assignment:

What self-care routines are most important to you during the holiday season? What do you let go of in the hustle and bustle of family and celebration, and what should you reclaim so that you can be your best? Leave your response in a comment below, or share your experience with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Self awareness and life as a backseat driver

Self awareness is not easy. How can you learn more self awareness and make decisions in line with your values and goals?

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

We’re great backseat drivers because it’s easy. Same with being the Monday morning quarterback. “Let me in, coach! I’ll knock the socks off those guys!”

 

We laugh (or get frustrated) at someone who’s sharing their opinion without actually executing, but there’s something deeper going on.

 

You see – it’s so easy to see how your friend could be happier, how someone else’s project could be run more efficiently, or what your sister’s positive qualities are.

 

We have no problem forming solutions and sharing them when they apply to other people.

 

Seeing these same solutions and qualities in ourselves? Not so easy.

 

Think about the times you’ve been in a relationship everyone else could see was wrong, or when a solution was right in front of your nose. Or, traits or positive qualities in yourself that took you a long time to see and appreciate in yourself. Those things that people tell you about yourself, but it took you a long time to believe.

 

This blindness hurts us.

 

It causes us to stay in situations that aren’t right for us. It causes us to make decisions that don’t put us on a path to fulfillment, and it causes us to not share our gifts with the world.

 

Why is this self-awareness so difficult? A few ideas:

  1. We’re so entrenched and close to the situations that we don’t see the larger picture/context for our lives.
  2. We have to actually act on it. It’s easy to say “you need to leave your job”, much harder to be the person that actually deals with the ramifications of that action.
  3. Fear. If we see the truth of our actions and vow to live in full alignment with our purpose, we have a lot more work to do.

 

How to cultivate that self-awareness:

  1. Talk with someone outside the situation. Working with a coach has been critical for my personal and professional development. By talking with someone completely removed from my situation, I’ve gotten an outsiders perspective and explain my thought process aloud – a very useful exercise.
  2. Indulge your vata. We’ve talked before about how following potential scenarios in your head can help you “try on” certain decisions without acting on them. If you did start that workout routine or quit that job or change cities…what could happen? What would be the pros and the cons? What barriers lie in your way? What could you learn? Does this choice remind you of something in your past, and what led to success or failure in that situation? Allow yourself to first imagine, so you can make the decision prepared and confident for what’s ahead.
  3. Know your strength. I’m currently reading “The Icarus Deception” by Seth Godin, and he tells an interesting story. Most of us are familiar with the story of Icarus – the boy who wanted to fly, so he built himself wings. Despite his father’s warning not to fly too close to the sun, Icarus gets greedy, does fly close to the sun, and then his wings melt and he falls to his death. The part that is not often told is that the father also warns Icarus not to fly too low. If he does so, his wings will get moist from the ocean and he will fail as well. We always worry about flying too high, but flying too low has it’s perils as well. You have the ability to soar, to get everything you want from life, and to excel. You are deserving of living a life that you love so completely and fully. How will you fly?

 

This week’s assignment:

Think of a time that you didn’t see a solution right in front of your face. What allowed your vision to clear? Is there something now you could use some more awareness on? Which of my 3 tips will you use to help you navigate ahead? Leave a comment below share your experience with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Super Healthy, Grain-Free Sweet Potato Pancake Recipe

Make this super healthy sweet potato pancake recipe for your next breakfast or brunch. They’re filling, decadent, and super healthy. High in protein, fiber, and vitamin A, they’ll keep you and your family happy and healthy through the fall and winter months

 

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

 

If you’d let me, I’d eat breakfast 3 meals a day.

 

There are so many options! You can go sweet or savory, raw or cooked, light or more substantial.

 

Many of you have heard about the famous, two-ingredient pancakes which are getting rave reviews from readers around the country (and are basically the breakfast I make for any house guests or whenever I need to show gratitude to someone sharing their house with me).

 

But my sister’s latex allergy (which means she can’t have foods like bananas, mangos, and avocados), made me want to try out some banana-free pancakes.

 

While these super healthy sweet potato pancakes have more than 2 ingredients, they are still free of flour, grains, and can even be sugar free.

 

The banana egg pancakes have a light, tropical feel, but the sweet potato pancakes are perfect for the chillier fall and winter days ahead. If anything, they seem even more like regular pancakes than the banana pancakes do, so you can fool even the pickiest eaters in your house.

 

And since we’re such close friends, I’ll let you in on an amazing secret: pair the pancakes with a little maple syrup and pecan butter (we used handmade, but you can find great pecan butter from Big Spoon here). It is the most delicious combination, and you’ll almost feel bad about how delicious it is.

 

The nutrition

Let’s count up the score, shall we? We have:

-Gluten-free

-dairy-free

-refined sugar-free

-high protein

-make with whole foods

-high in fiber and vitamin A

-delicious

-easy

-store well!

 

Time to get cooking! 

 

Super Healthy Grain-Free Sweet Potato Pancakes
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Make these sweet potato pancakes for your next breakfast or brunch. They’re filling, decadent, and super healthy. High in protein, fiber, and vitamin A, they’ll keep you and your family happy and healthy through the fall and winter months!
Author:
Serves: 2 as a full breakfast
Ingredients
  • 1 ½ cups cooked sweet potato
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ginger
  • Coconut oil (for pan)
  • 1 tsp honey (optional)
  • Almond, peanut, or sunflower seed butter (for dipping, optional)
  • Maple syrup (for dipping, optional)
  • Jam (for dipping, optional)
Instructions
  1. Combine the sweet potato, eggs, chia, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and honey (if using) in a blender and blend until combined and smooth. (If your batter is too thick, just add a few tablespoons of water and blend!)
  2. Preheat your skillet to medium/high heat with coconut oil.
  3. Spoon out the batter onto the skillet – about 2 tbsp for each pancake (works best if the pancakes are about 3 inches in diameter).
  4. When the bottoms of the pancakes begin to solidify and turn brown, flip the pancakes over.
  5. Cook until browned on the bottom (you want them to still be fluffy and slightly squishy through the middle.)
  6. Keep warm until serving.
  7. When serving, top with nut butter and a bit of jam or maple syrup

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

2016-07-15_07.54.46

Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!

 


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Election Recovery

In our 2016 election recovery – how do we move forward with acceptance, peace, and compassion?

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

Looking for a little pre-holiday happiness? Join me at my Relaxing Urban Retreat on Sunday, November 20th for a day of yoga, nourishing food, and community. Register here.

 

Note: this post is not going to be a political lambast. You know that HHH is all about non-judgement and peace. Please read through fully and with an open mind. Thank you for your understanding.

 

This was my first election season in DC.

 

I was ready for the campaigning, the political ads, the constant chatter about it at restaurants and bars.

 

I wasn’t ready for the energy.

 

Starting on election day, there was this energy in the air. This panic. This manic burst of electricity all over the city. The day after was even worse. Think about it: a huge percentage of the city’s population would be leaving DC, knowing that the change in power means upheaval and change in their own lives.

 

Buddhist teacher Ethan Nichtern said it very well. “The story of this election is not blame. The story of this election is white people not knowing what to do with fear. I know how that feels.” (emphasis mine)

 

Now whether or not you agree with him about the election being about fear, I appreciate the sentiment:

I know how that feels. Every single person spewing hateful rhetoric, whether it’s towards Democrats, Republicans, Third Party Voters, the press, the FBI director, old people, young people, Hispanics, or any other group – is expressing a fear we have found in ourselves.

 

Maybe we don’t openly discriminate against minorities. Or treat women as play objects. But maybe we villainize the slow coworker. Or your ex boyfriend. Or you villainize your own aging process. The mistakes you’ve made in the past. The weaknesses. The troubles.

 

We all have fear and pain inside of us.

 

The unenlightened response to that fear: to attack others. To claim the other is the problem. The other is what is making your pain real.

 

The enlightened response: see that their fear is your fear. That you’ve felt this pain too. And to then seek the tools and the help to move through that fear with as little negative impact on others as possible.

 

It’s about attempting to clear the negative energy with love, not hate.

 

“Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself”- Rumi

 

This Week’s Assignment:

Do a favor for your fellow humankind and do something to bring more love and kindness into the world today. Share what you did to spread the love by commenting below or sharing your experience with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig
This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Remembering who you are

When faced with a difficult situation: remember who you are. It will keep you from letting that negativity spread through the rest of your life.

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

Being friendly doesn’t mean you never run into conflict.

 

Case in point: I had a pretty tumultuous relationship with my advisor in graduate school. It cause me a lot of stress and distress. There was tossing and turning, there was anger and frustration, and there were a lot of tears.

 

Even after I graduated and I was living in a different city, the mention of her name or conversation about my dissertation would make this wellspring of anger rise up in me.

 

I was incredibly uncomfortable with this feeling, and throughout my time at UNC I did whatever I could to keep my anger in check proceed peacefully with my advisor.

 

Luckily, this extreme distress didn’t overwhelm my entire life, likely because I was working so mindfully to contain it. Many people aren’t as fortunate: a negative relationship or work environment overtakes their lives. They stop exercising, seeing friends, and taking care of themselves. They act in ways they wouldn’t under normal circumstances.

 

I think the best tool I used during that time to maintain healthy habits and my happiness was to remember who I am.

 

You see, whenever I was dealing with my advisor, I would forget. I would forget who I was. I would get angry, sad, and stressed. I wouldn’t living up to my own values and standards for how I want to live my life. I felt like I didn’t even recognize myself.

 

So I took measures to remember who I am.

 

My officemate and I decorated the office with inspirational quotes that correlated with the weekly newsletters I was writing each week. I made yoga a non-negotiable in my day. I made time to talk with friends and family who I was comfortable with being silly, happy, and carefree.

 

Remember who I am. That was the secret.

 

Now whether you’re going through a difficult time or not, figuring out what it means to “remember who you are” is incredibly important. For some people, it involves retreating and spending more time at home. For others, it’s getting out and getting active.

 

Ask yourself: Who am I? What do I value? What are the non-negotiables I need in my life to remember who I am?

 

If you have those practices in place, then the other ups and downs don’t phase you as much. Hard situations aren’t as serious, because you’re still you. You’re still taking care of your needs.

 

No matter the situation – you are you. Sometimes we just need help remembering.

 

This Week’s Assignment:

What makes you you? Make a list of some of your favorite activities that you want to maintain, no matter the circumstances Has there ever been a time in your life that you forgot who you were? How did you remember again?  Head on over to our private Facebook group and answer our poll. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig
This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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The Best You Can

Are you doing the best you can? What about everyone around you? Read this post to rethink and redefine “best”.

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

Do you think people are doing the best that they can?

This was a question that in her book, Rising Strong, Brene Brown claims she became obsessed with, and I have to admit, this past week, I did as well.

 

It’s an interesting question, right? Are the people you come into contact with on a day-to-day basis trying their best? (editors note: when I read over this draft, I realized I had written “there best” in the previous sentence…)

 

Before you jump to your conclusion: some ground rules.

  • We’re not saying that each person is living up to their highest potential.
  • We are not saying that these people are at the pinnacle of success in their career and lives.
  • What we are saying is that at this given moment, people are making decisions and acting in a way that is the best that they can do in that moment.

So what do you think? In Rising Strong, Brene talks about how she used to be of the “people are not doing their best” camp. And she stayed firmly in this position, until she one day experienced a friend claiming that Brene was not doing her best. Brene sat there and said to herself…”but I am doing my best.” And in that instant, she realized that her perception of what were people’s best was flawed. Only we ourselves know if we’re doing our best in any given moment.

 

Two important things that Brene noticed about this question:

  1. People who believed that others weren’t doing their best were often hardest on themselves. These people aren’t unkind or cruel, they simply have very high standards for themselves and others. Brene found that as people released some of the pressure they put on themselves to be the most successful or the best compared to others, the more they were actually able to relax into doing their personal best in this moment. (That means experiencing a lot less stress).
  2. When you believe that those around you are doing their best, difficult situations don’t seem all that bad, and you develop a deep sense of compassion. This was fascinating to me. What happens is that when someone disappointing happens – maybe a coworker doesn’t pull his weight on a project, or your friend flakes on your dinner plans – you don’t sit around and get angry about what happened. You don’t take up time and energy wondering why they’re doing it or take it personally that they didn’t pull through. Instead, you start to search and see if there could be a reason why this person is giving their best at this time. Maybe there’s something you can do to support them. Maybe you can let it go. And of course, maybe you can realize that this person’s best is not what you need right now, and it’s time to end the business or personal relationship. But the point is that instead of stewing about it, you move forward and make a decision. Progress is made.

 

It’s very important to note here that if you don’t believe people are doing their best, I’m not saying you’re a bad person. Of course not! However, it’s interesting to look into your brain patterns and see how you perceive the situations around you. If you’re finding yourself perpetually disappointed or in drama with the people in your life, it might be worth it to consider whether shifting your thoughts around this issue might lead to more happiness.

 

This Week’s Assignment:

So let’s here it: do you believe people are doing their best? Head on over to our private Facebook group and answer our poll. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig
This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Embrace your vata

Feeling indecisive? Use this technique to embrace your vata and make decisions easier.

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

I was on a call with a potential client a few days ago, and we were discussing future goals. He has a successful position in sales, knows that he wants to transition into a different position, but doesn’t know exactly what that position would be.

As we discussed some of the reasons why he was having difficulty envisioning a future dream, he said “I just have all of these different options in my head- there are so many ways that I can go, and I don’t know which is the right one.”

Something clicked in my head – “Ah-ha! My dear- you are vata.”

He looked at me a little confused, so I explained.

Vata is one of the three doshas, or qualities, in Ayurveda. Vata is a way of describing things, people, or times of day. Vata is fall – it’s the brisk breeze and the cooler temperatures. It’s dryness. It’s airy-ness. It’s you looking at a huge menu and feeling overwhelmed. It’s willy-nilly dreaming without making a decision. That is vata.

Now vata can be both good and bad. Your vata can be in balance, which means that you’re able to see all of the moving parts of a situation and bring them together to create unique solutions. Or it can be out of balance, which means that you’re starting tons of projects without finishing them, or feeling unable to actually pin something down and accomplish it.

When our vata goes out of balance, it’s easy to get into a panic. Things aren’t getting done and we feel a little lost. It’s like walking through an unknown place and reaching a room with 20 doors. They all look good, and you can’t seem to decide which is the best.

If you’re having a hard time pinning down your next steps, the answer is not to deny your vata and try to brute-force choose an answer. Instead, your job is to indulge your vata. Take advantage of all of the possibilities you see in front of you.

When we get lost in that hallway with all of the doors, our problem is that we don’t fully understand what’s behind each door, so we don’t know what to choose. If instead we indulge the vata and actually see where each door leads, you can actually make a decision.

The best way to do this is to get out a pen and paper (or a digital way of documenting your work), and lay out all of the options you see in front of you. Follow each scenario: what would happen if you took that job or moved to that city? What are the pros and cons? What would your life be like? What is the worst that could happen? As you actually play out the scenarios, each choice becomes more real. Instead of an ethereal potential, it becomes a practical reality.

As you indulge your vata, you give your brain space to calm down, to settle back to the earth, and actually move forward with the full assurance that you’ve thought it through.

This week’s assignment:

Think of a decision you’re having a hard time making. What are all of the different possibilities in front of you? Get out a pen and paper, and play these scenarios out.  You can share your experience in the comments below or with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig
This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

2016-07-15_07.54.46

Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Healthy Apple Cider Muffins -gluten free & vegan!

Try these healthy apple cider muffins if you need a dose of fall and a simple, healthy treat to energize your day!

healthy apple cider muffins photo

 

I wear a lot of hats during my day. Sometimes I’m in the kitchen making healthy food for my snack food line or for my cooking classes. You can find me leading yoga classes, or helping individuals improve their energy and diet through personalized wellness plans.

 

You could say that’s a lot of different things, but to me, they’re all unified under the goal of helping people live their happiest, healthiest life in full alignment with their values and goals. The yoga, the nutrition, the food, those are just some of the tools I use to help people get there.

 

So even though sometimes we’re talking about headstand, and sometimes we’re talking about how to prioritize your schedule….they’re all with the same goal of living your life in full alignment.

 

It’s with this goal that I started throwing Yoga Parties. A yoga party is a yoga class with tea, snacks, and time to talk and hang out with friends new and old after class. It lasts a little longer than your typical yoga class, but you also get the benefits of nourishing your body and meeting new friends.

 

samantha attard yoga photo

Photo by Andrew Wright

My first few Yoga Parties were held in Meridian Hill Park, and were they a blast. Most participants said their favorite part was connecting with new people they wouldn’t have met otherwise. It was amazing.

 

The Yoga Parties will be slowing down for the winter season, but I’m excited to continue to bring food, yoga, and community together at some other events this winter (be sure to check out my calendar for the latest updates!)

 

Now onto the muffins. I made these apple cider muffins for my last yoga party because I wanted a delicious, filling treat with flavors of fall. These muffins do not disappoint.

 

They’re made with a combination of almond, oat, and chickpea flours for a high-protein blend of gluten free flours! I use flax to replace the egg, and apple cider to sweeten it up. They’re moist, light, and delicious!

 

Check out the recipe below, and let me know in the comments: what does living a life of alignment mean to you?

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

 

Apple Cider Muffins
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 20 mini muffins
Ingredients
  • 2 tbsp flax seed, ground
  • 6 tbsp water
  • 1 cup oat flour (or ground oats)
  • ¾ cup chickpea/garbanzo flour
  • ¾ cup almond flour
  • ¾ cup brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp hemp hearts
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup apple cider
  • 6 tbsp melted coconut oil
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350F
  2. Mix ground flax seeds with water in a small bowl.
  3. Mix ground oats, chickpea, almond flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, and hemp hearts together.
  4. Heat up the apple cider until gently boiling and then combine it with coconut oil.
  5. Add coconut oil/apple cider to the dry flours, and mix until combined.
  6. Then, fold in the flax seed mixture and mix gently until JUST mixed.
  7. Pour into muffin tins, bake for 30 min or until firm.
  8. Let muffins cool in tins.
  9. If you like moist muffins - spoon a teaspoon of apple cider on cooked muffin tops as they cool!
  10. Store in sealed container or freeze for later use!

 

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

2016-07-15_07.54.46

Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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WeLive Fall Flavors: Lentil Soup Recipe

Make this lentil soup recipe if you need a fast, satisfying Fall dinner. It’s filling, delicious, and super healthy – a crowd pleaser for sure! 

welive lentil soup recipe

 

In my opinion, there are lots of things to love about fall. Slightly cooler temperatures, beautiful leaves changing colors, pumpkins and birthdays and halloween…it’s a fabulous time.

 

One of my favorite parts of fall? The food. Everything gets a little cozier and warmer, which suits my vata dosha quite well.

 

It’s been especially nice to introduce my favorite fall flavors at my bi-weekly healthy cooking class at WeLive. We’ve been making soups, Buddha Bowls, and warming foods.

 

This past week, I made my favorite lentil soup recipe. It combines Indian spices like cumin, turmeric, and coriander with a healthy dose of greens from kale and parsley, and a splash of hearty tomato to round out all of the flavors. This soup has it all. It’s hearty, healthy, and satisfying.

 

Serve this soup on it’s own, over some rice, or with your favorite starch of choice. Most importantly, it’s a great leftover soup, so don’t be afraid to double the recipe!

 

Happy Fall, my darlings!

 

Lentil Soup with Rice Roasted Mango
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 white or yellow onion, finely diced
  • 1 Tbsp ground cumin
  • 1 Tbsp ground coriander
  • ¾ tsp sea salt
  • 4 stalks celery, chopped
  • 4 carrots, chopped
  • 3 cups dried lentils, rinsed
  • 32 oz diced tomatoes
  • 1 bunch kale, chopped
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • ½ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • 2 tsp nutritional yeast
  • 1 cup almond yogurt
Instructions
  1. Heat oil, onion, cumin, coriander, and ¼ tsp salt in a large stock pot over medium heat.
  2. Once soft, add chopped celery and carrots. Heat through for 5 minutes.
  3. Add rinsed lentils and enough water to cover the lentils. Cook until soft (~20 minutes).
  4. Add diced tomatoes, turmeric, pepper, and salt to taste.
  5. When fully heated, add kale and lemon juice.
  6. Serve sprinkled with parsley, nutritional yeast, and almond yogurt!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

2016-07-15_07.54.46

Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!

 


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