A simple holistic Ayurveda tip for better digestion

Do you get acid reflux, indigestion, or gas after you eat? Try this simple, 30-second tip from Ayurveda for a holistic approach to better digestion.

holistic digestion tip photo 1

 

Picture this: you’re out to dinner with friends, and you’re enjoying your meal so much that you linger after the food is finished for good conversation.

 

As soon as you stop eating, instead of a pleasant full sensation, your stomach feels like there’s a rock in it. Your acid reflux starts to kick up, and you’re just plain uncomfortable. Suddenly all the joy and relaxation is gone, and your stress levels keep increasing as your stomach continues to feel bad.

 

There are many potential causes of this indigestion. Maybe you ate too much. Maybe it was a little too spicy, heavy, or greasy. Maybe you ate it really quickly, or standing up.  In all of these cases, the fact remains: your body isn’t digesting your food in an efficient, pleasant way.

 

Luckily, there’s an easy way to help you improve your digestive capabilities and reduce some of the unpleasant side-effects of an overly large meal: fennel.

 

simply organic fennel photo

What’s so great about fennel?

According to Ayurveda, the ancient system of Indian medicine, fennel is a cooling herb that stimulates your digestive power. In Western medicine, we know that fennel includes many antioxidants, including anethole, which suppresses TNF alpha, a major inflammatory signaling compound in the body. Anethole, fenchone, and estragole also are anti-spomodic, meaning they help your intestinal muscles relax and not create gas.

 

How do you get the powerful benefits of fennel seeds? Seema, my host at the Johari House in Haridwar, India gave me this tip: simply roast fennel seeds, mix with a large-crystal sugar, and chew on a ½ teaspoon after your meals.

 

By chewing on these seeds after your meal, you release those beneficial compounds to settle your stomach and freshen your breath. I find that it’s particularly useful for helping me stop snacking and signal that the meal is over.

 

Making the seeds couldn’t be simpler, and it’s something you only need to do about once per week. I pack the seeds/sugar mixture in a spice bottle that I carry in my purse, so I’m never without it!

 

holistic digestion photo

 

I love it when the quick fix is a natural, healthy solution, don’t you?

 

Check out the recipe below, and leave your thoughts in the comments: what digestion issues are the worst for you? How have you tried to solve them in the past? Can’t wait to hear your insights.

 

Fennel Digestif
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 4 tsp fennel seeds
  • 2 tsp large-crystal sugar like demerra
Instructions
  1. In a skillet, roast 2 tsp of fennel seeds on medium heat.
  2. When fennel turns fragrant and begins to brown, remove from the heat.
  3. Mix with the other fennel seeds and sugar.
  4. Store in a air-tight container for up to a month.

 

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!

 

 

 


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Your ultimate guide to heal adrenal fatigue naturally

Adrenal fatigue is all to common in our fast paced, 24/7 365 work schedule. Learn the best Eastern and Western remedies to heal adrenal fatigue naturally.
This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!
One of the most important things me and my clients talk about is stress. Stress affects your diet in a few ways. On the one hand, stress makes you much more likely to eat a donut :), but on the other hand, external stressors cause internal stress. The surge of hormones you get with stress can impact your blood sugar, insulin, thyroid, sleep, energy, and hormones. That’s…basically everything in your body.
For many of my clients, the constant barrage of stressful situations and hormones results in adrenal fatigue. This means that your body has been pumping out cortisol and adrenaline (stress hormones) so much that your body stops responding to it. As a result, you feel overly tired and unable to handle stressors when they surface.
Does this sound like something you or someone you love encounters often? Read on.
Combating adrenal fatigue requires a multi-pronged approach. There are changes both internally and externally that have to happen.
Here’s my main tips for dealing with adrenal fatigue:
Nutrition and supplements:
  1. Make grounding, nourishing foods a part of your regular routine. When you have a lot of stress going on, it’s easy to skip meals, to eat while standing, or indulge in unhealthy convenience food. Unfortunately, no matter how comforting that cinnamon roll is, it’s actually going to counteract your efforts to heal adrenal fatigue by bombarding your body with more stress. Instead, opt for regular meals, eaten seated, with an emphasis on fresh fruits and vegetables. Your body will thank you.
  2. Reduce sugar and glucose swings. Along the same lines, you’ll want to reduce the sugar in your diet. The more sugar you include in your diet, the more your blood sugar increases and decreases throughout the day. These swings in blood sugar translate to stress in your body and hormones, as well as swings in your energy levels. You’ll find a more even keel and stability in your body the more you include protein and healthy fats in your meals.
  3. Add some adaptogens:
    1. Maca! This is a powder you can add to morning oatmeal, to smoothies, even cookies! My favorite way to enjoy it is on brazil nuts (here’s the recipe), which is a great snack for your thyroid health!
    2. Chaga or Cordecyps mushrooms: I love to brew it as a tea (from here). It’s pretty savory tasting, but oh so good for you.
    3. Ginseng – great for boosting memory and also giving you energy! (use practitioner code 0819 to get your wholesale discount if you choose to buy from vital nutrients!)
  4. Vitamin B12 – Also a potent energy generator. You can buy here, or buy any supplement made with methylcobalamin. (use practitioner code 0819 to get your wholesale discount if you choose to buy from vital nutrients!)
  5. Vitamin D – you live up north, you’re working a lot. Get yourself some energy and a strong immune system. 2000 IU /day, unless you have been tested and know you have a deficiency, let me know! (use practitioner code 0819 to get your wholesale discount if you choose to buy from vital nutrients!)
Movement:
  1. This might not be the time to take up Spartan races or Cross Fit. Power Yoga might not even be right for you! Instead opt for walks, yin or restorative yoga, dancing, or team sports. Find a way to move your body that you enjoy. Find a way to make yourself smile.
Self care:
  1. Time to find a daily ritual. Something that really rejuvenates and makes you feel like you. It could take 2 minutes or it might be 20. Take an action that connects deeply to you and refreshes your body.
Mindfulness:
  1. find a way to add a mindfulness practice to your day. It could be as simple as driving without any music on. Or doing a walk without music or texting when you go to lunch. It could be a formal meditation practice. Your choice. But it’s time to spend some energy noticing what’s happening in your body.
Remove yourself from situations:
  1. Sometimes the only action that’s left is to remove yourself from the stressful situations. Are there particular people or places that are causing this unease? Could you be in unhealthy relationships or situations on a daily basis? It might be an act of self care to remove yourself.
If you’re dealing with adrenal fatigue or just need more stress support, know that you’re not alone. It’s the task of this work work culture to learn how to reframe stressful situations and build resilience in all that we do. And if you need to work on a more personalized plan, I’d love to support you. Simply send me an email at sam@behappyhealthyhuman.com to set up a complimentary consultation.
This week’s assignment:

Do you or someone you know have any of the signs of adrenal fatigue? What one recommendation do you think you could introduce into your life to bring it back into balance? Put your thoughts in the comments below, or you can share your experience with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Join the Happy Healthy family to get special invites, event discounts, and lessons on living with intention.


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Vegan Sushi Burrito with Red Chili Sauce

vegan sushi burrito photo

It’s easy to take food for granted. We eat it 3+ times, every single day, for our entire lives.

 

But our food deserves a little ceremony. As we slow down our meals, we have room to breathe, enjoy our company, eat a little less, and actually reduce our stress rather than add to it.

 

Sushi is the perfect place to start. Have you ever seen Jiro Dreams of Sushi? This Japanese chef meticulously prepares his ingredients and has such pride in his work. It kind of makes you think twice about ever eating grocery store sushi again.

 

We’re going to bring a little bit of ceremony back into our cooking with this veggie sushi. The ingredients themselves are easy to prepare, the only trick is getting it to roll up.

 

That’s why I love making sushi burritos! You roll up the sushi in wax paper, and simply cut in half instead of making thin little slices. There’s a lot less potential for disaster, and it makes for a super satisfying meal.

 

The secret ingredient in this burrito? Mother In Law’s Gochujang Paste. It has a satisfying, deep, spicy flavor. I’d just eat it out of the bottle, but it tastes even more amazing mixed up with peanut butter, lime, tamari, and maple syrup in a fabulous paste. Give it a try!

mother in lows gochujang sauce

 

This meal was perfect for my healthy cooking class at WeLive Crystal City. Everyone pitched in to make this a success, and boy was it delicious.

 

 

 

Veggie Sushi with Red Chili Sauce
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • Sushi
  • 2 nori sheets
  • 4 oz cooked quinoa
  • 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1 cucumber, cut thinly into 2 inch sticks
  • 1 sweet potato, thinly sliced into 2 inch sticks
  • 1 avocado, thinly sliced
  • 4 oz extra firm tofu, pressed and thinly sliced
  • 1 handful spinach
  • 1 handful sesame seeds.
  • Dressing
  • ¼ cup peanut butter
  • juice from 1 lime
  • 1 tsp Mother in Law's Gochujang
  • 1 tsp honey or maple syrup
  • 2 tsp tamari
Instructions
  1. Prepare Ingredients:
  2. Rinse quinoa and place in a pan with double the water. Boil at medium-high heat until quinoa gets soft (~15-20 min).
  3. Cut sweet potatoes into match sticks, and boil until soft.
  4. Cut cucumbers, tofu, and avocado. Use a paper towel to get rid of any excess water on the tofu or cucumber.
  5. Make dressing: Blend peanut butter, lime juice, tamari, gochujang, and water until smooth.
  6. Once quinoa has boiled, drain any excess water. Add rice vinegar and 1 tsp tamari. Put on medium low heat to boil off any excess water.
  7. Prepare Sushi:
  8. Lay out nori on a flat surface.
  9. Spread with a very thin layer of quinoa, leaving a ¼ inch strip along one end.
  10. Sprinkle with sesame seeds.
  11. Lay out tofu, sweet potato, cucumber, avocado, spinach, and cover with dressing.
  12. To roll: fold over one end of the nori on top of the filling. Tuck the end under the ingredients, nad continue to roll. You can use a little water on the end of the nori that is not covered in quinoa to help the nori stick.
  13. If making a burrito, wrap the sushi in wax paper and cut in half to eat.
  14. If making traditional sushi, use a wet knife to cut the sushi into thin slices (~1 inch wide).
  15. Consume immediately and enjoy!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Join the Happy Healthy family to get special invites, event discounts, and lessons on living with intention.

 


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The difference between relaxing and self-care

 

Do you do things to relax but still feel burnt out? It might be time to take some true self-care into your daily routine.

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

A question for you: What do you do on a daily basis that is a true act of self-care? Maybe you read some fiction, take a quiet walk, journal, play an instrument, meditate? What do you have as a deliberate time of feeding your soul and spirit?

 

I asked this question to a burnt-out client this week, and she realized… she didn’t actually have one. Her life had become so full of going, going, going (grad school and a full time job will do that to you), that was had stopped taking time for herself in her day.

 

And what a shame that is. When we get busy busy, rest and rejuvenation is the last thing we make time for. And yet, it’s actually the most important thing we can do.

 

Now I’m not usually one to quote bible verses, but I do like this proverb about farming, and I think it’s applicable here. The bible guides us to plant crops for 6 years, and then let the land lay fallow (i.e., nothing to harvest) for a 7th year. In agricultural terms, this makes complete sense: plants take nourishment from the soil, and you have to give the soil a year of rest to replenish the nutrients that make things able to grow again.

 

Do you see how this relates?

All day long, we have all of these energy outputs. We teach, we parent, we work, we move…if we keep giving all of that nourishment without taking energy back in, we’re going to eventually run out of gas.

 

This is exactly what happened to my client. All of that giving of energy has led her deep into adrenal fatigue, which is essentially her body saying “That’s enough! No more stress!” and as a result feeling incredibly tired and lower energy all of the time (We’ll talk more about adrenal fatigue next week.)

 

Maybe when I asked my question at the beginning, you thought “I do lots of things to relax!” But are any one of those something that you do daily, no matter what?

 

My conversation with Ellen made me realize that doing things to relax is different than having a daily deliberate self-care action.

 

For example, my day is completely filled with yoga. I teach, I practice…I move my body daily. But I was still feeling over-run and like I wasn’t getting in me time. Part of my New Years Resolution was to start my day with 10-15 minutes of yoga. I realized that getting that movement in the morning, even if I was going to do yoga later in the day, made a meaningful difference in how I felt and interacted with others.

 

Simply doing yoga wasn’t enough, I needed to put it as a deliberate daily ritual at the start f my day to truly make a difference.

 

Maybe for you, casually reading blogs is “relaxing”, but spending 20 minutes with a fiction book before bed would truly feed your soul. Or perhaps you go for a walk with your dog each day, but you’re usually listening to the news or thinking about work, rather than making it a deliberate time to unplug.

 

Commit to this daily practice of self-care, and you’ll truly see benefits beyond just relaxing.

 

This week’s assignment:

Do you have a daily self-care ritual? What benefits does it give you? If not, what small action could you take daily to help nourish your own spirit? Post a comment below or share your experience with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Join the Happy Healthy family to get special invites, event discounts, and lessons on living with intention.


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Deciding when to give up

Let’s look at how thinking about when to give up can actually cause more stress than simply ending it in the first place.

 

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

As you guys know, I’m obsessed with wording. How you phrase something can mean so much for the emotions related to those words. It can change your view of the situation, your creativity in problem solving, and make a huge difference in how people respond to them.

 

So in today’s post- let’s take on another phrase that has a lot of negative energy around it, but gets used all the time: giving up.
We “give up” in relationships, on tests, on hobbies, on businesses, on jobs, on efforts. Giving up is used all the time to replace “ending”. “finishing” “moving on”. And yet we use “giving up”. Why?
 

Giving up implies failure. It implies that something that should have continued is no longer. It says that we are going to stop progress. We are halting. You’re running the marathon, but you decide to just sit down at mile 16 and sing a song instead.

Think about the last time you “gave up” on something. Was that really what you were doing? Were you deciding to be contrarian and not go along with the plans?
Likely not. When we choose to end something, most of the time it’s not about failure.
Instead, choosing to end something is a deep act of self-care and strength. We are having the courage to say “i know it would be easier to keep fighting for this thing, but fighting isn’t want I want to do any more.”
Giving up isn’t deviating from the path, we’re actually following our true path.
Yes, this true path is a little harder to explain. We have a culture of work work work work work (kinda like Rihanna), and when you’re done with that work you should probably do jusssst a little more. Because if we work the hardest, we’ll have the most success, right?
Yes, many good things in life are worth fighting for. And I in no way believe that everything should be seamless and easy. But you get to decide where you spend your time and energy. And choosing to not give your time to a specific cause is not failure. It is strength.
So next time you decide to stop doing something, here are some ways you can phrase it instead of saying that you’re giving up:
  1. “That was an interesting project to work on. And now I’m doing X instead!”
  2. “I did put a lot of effort into that training. I’m not doing it anymore, but I learned so much from it!”
  3. “There were some unexpected twists and turns. I’m glad to have more energy to put into Y now.”
You are not giving up. You are moving forward.
This week’s assignment:

What is a project or situation that you’ve recently decided to end? Did you think of it as giving up? How can you reframe it more positively? Comment below or  share your experience with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Join the Happy Healthy family to get special invites, event discounts, and lessons on living with intention.


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How to make any soup great & my hearty lentil soup recipe

how to make soup photo 2

Cooking becomes infinitely easier when you don’t have to use a recipe anymore. When you don’t need recipes, you can start to build meals using the ingredients you already have, rather than having to go out shopping every time you need to make dinner. It means you have a sense of how longs things will take to make, so you can time your meals accordingly. It saves you 25 minutes of googling, and means you can get straight to making your meals.

 

So how do you learn to cook without recipes? Templates. You figure out the components and ordering of ingredients, so you can start to swap out ingredients and flavors accordingly.

 

Let’s start with soup, or any one-pot cooked meal. Here are the components:

  1. Oil or fat base
  2. Flavor base (spices, onions, garlic)
  3. Starch (potatoes, carrots, whole grains)
  4. Veggies
  5. Protein source (lentils, eggs, meat)
  6. Liquid (water or stock)
  7. Toppings

 

Here’s the ordering:

  1. Heat up your oil/fat base.
  2. Add your flavor base and cook until soft.
  3. Add your starches and veggies with liquid.
  4. Add your protein source – this might go in early in the cooking process or later depending on how long that protein source needs to cook.
  5. Add toppings.

 

Simple right?

how to make soup photo 1

Here is the formula applied to my favorite winter lentil soup. It’s hearty and filling, while also being super healthy and delicious. It comes together in under an hour, and it will leave your whole family asking for more.

 

Hearty Lentil Soup Roasted Brussels Sprouts and “jamon”
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • • 1 white or yellow onion, finely diced
  • • 1 cup chopped mushroom
  • • 1 tbsp ground cumin
  • • ¾ tsp sea salt
  • • 1 tsp black pepper
  • • 2 tsp Better than Boullion
  • • 4 stalks celery, chopped
  • • 4 carrots, chopped
  • • 3 cups dried lentils, rinsed
  • • 18 oz diced tomatoes
  • • 1 cup spinach
  • • 1 cup purple or red potatoes, chopped
Instructions
  1. • Heat oil, onion, onion, cumin, and ¼ tsp salt in a large stock pot over medium heat.
  2. • Once soft, add chopped celery, carrots, tomatoes, and potatoes. Heat through for 5 minutes.
  3. • Add rinsed lentils and enough water to cover the lentils. Cook until soft (~20 minutes).
  4. • When fully heated, add spinach and a teaspoon of Better than Bouillon.
  5. • Adjust seasoning and serve with bread!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Join the Happy Healthy family to get special invites, event discounts, and lessons on living with intention.

 

 

 


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3 steps to *actually* make a habit change

 

We all know habit change is hard, but we often forget about 2 critical steps in the process. Read below to make sure you’re not forgetting these important steps.

 

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

 

In the car last week, it truly struck me. Changing a habit or thought pattern is not a 1-step process. It’s actually 3.

 

How many times have you been told that snacking at night is hindering your weight loss? Or have you been told that short bursts of high intensity exercise are truly good for you? Or that sleeping more will make a huge difference in your health?

 

And yet, it’s pretty hard to put all of those pieces of advice into practice.

 

That’s what I was thinking about this week. There’s a big difference between:

  1. Intellectually knowing something
  2. Emotionally internalizing it
  3. Actually acting on it.

 

And to not acknowledge these three steps is a disservice to yourself. Because when we think that we should hear something and immediately be able to put it into action…we get frustrated or sad when or if we don’t succeed.

 

So three steps. How do we move from hearing something and “knowing” it to actually doing it? This is where emotionally internalizing it comes into play.

 

So how do you emotionally internalize new knowledge?

 

Take out a journal, a piece of paper, or a fresh word document and answer these questions:

  1. What did I learn?
  2. What did I believe before I knew this knowledge?
  3. What do I believe now that I know this knowledge?
  4. How would my life change if I implemented this knowledge?

Answering these questions help you understand how important this new knowledge is. Instead of equally weighting the importance of every piece of advice you hear, you can decide – how does this knowledge change my worldview? How does this impact my life today and in the future?

 

What it ultimately does is help you decide which pieces of knowledge you actually want to implement into your life, and what impact you think it will have on you.

 

The next piece is putting it into action.

 

Once you’ve decided that this new knowledge is important to you, it’s time to put it into practice. Get back out that word document, and ask yourself:

  1. What would putting this knowledge into practice look like for me?
  2. What would get in the way of putting this knowledge into practice?
  3. How can I stay accountable to this new knowledge?
  4. What preparation steps do I need to take in order to put this knowledge into practice?

 

What these questions do is allow you to get practical. You figure out what you want to do, what’s standing in your way, and how you keep yourself on track. This is what makes sure you remember this new knowledge and put it into practice.

 

This week’s assignment:

What’s a piece of advice you’ve heard recently that you haven’t been able to put into practice yet? Answer the questions from this post, and decide your course of action. Share in the comments below or with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Join the Happy Healthy family to get special invites, event discounts, and lessons on living with intention.


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The Luxury of Mindfulness

Is mindfulness a luxury? Should self-realization be a priority when there’s so much sadness in the world? Let’s talk.

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

A few weeks ago I led a conversation with Innovators Box about mindfulness. One of the participants comments is still on my brain.

 

She said that with all of the trouble and difficulty in the world – mindfulness is a privilege. We are privileged to not have to worry about the source of our next meal or shelter. We get to worry about happiness and living our best life.

 

For some people, this statement induces guilt. Who are we to worry about mindfulness? Shouldn’t our energy go towards helping those in need? Or eradicating the hunger, and then we can all worry about mindfulness?

 

I understand this sentiment. I’m lucky to spend as much time and energy as I do thinking about my own happiness. I’m fortunate that the things which cause me stress are minuscule compared to what many people are dealing with.

 

However, I also don’t think this should be a cause for guilt or shame. Self-care and mindfulness is a privilege, and it’s also a responsibility.

 

I have the luxury of thinking about how to live my best life. That also means I have the luxury to think about how others can live their best lives too. If I was trying to solve world hunger without first putting my own brain and emotional state in the right place, I’d be hard pressed to find creative, effective solutions.

 

If I’m going to be the best problem-solver, friend, coach, and leader, I need to be in the best place physically and mentally possible.

 

I keep coming back to the same quote: “put on your mask on before assisting others.”

 

Self-care, mindfulness, meditation, yoga…these are not selfish acts. They are gifts to those around you.

 

It’s a privilege, and it’s a responsibility. With our recent Thanksgiving holiday, we get to think of all of the things we’re grateful for. Let’s take this gratitude and act on it – let’s truly treat ourselves so incredibly well, so that we can give our best to others.

 

This week’s assignment:

What self-care routines are most important to you during the holiday season? What do you let go of in the hustle and bustle of family and celebration, and what should you reclaim so that you can be your best? Leave your response in a comment below, or share your experience with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Join the Happy Healthy family to get special invites, event discounts, and lessons on living with intention.


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Self awareness and life as a backseat driver

Self awareness is not easy. How can you learn more self awareness and make decisions in line with your values and goals?

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

We’re great backseat drivers because it’s easy. Same with being the Monday morning quarterback. “Let me in, coach! I’ll knock the socks off those guys!”

 

We laugh (or get frustrated) at someone who’s sharing their opinion without actually executing, but there’s something deeper going on.

 

You see – it’s so easy to see how your friend could be happier, how someone else’s project could be run more efficiently, or what your sister’s positive qualities are.

 

We have no problem forming solutions and sharing them when they apply to other people.

 

Seeing these same solutions and qualities in ourselves? Not so easy.

 

Think about the times you’ve been in a relationship everyone else could see was wrong, or when a solution was right in front of your nose. Or, traits or positive qualities in yourself that took you a long time to see and appreciate in yourself. Those things that people tell you about yourself, but it took you a long time to believe.

 

This blindness hurts us.

 

It causes us to stay in situations that aren’t right for us. It causes us to make decisions that don’t put us on a path to fulfillment, and it causes us to not share our gifts with the world.

 

Why is this self-awareness so difficult? A few ideas:

  1. We’re so entrenched and close to the situations that we don’t see the larger picture/context for our lives.
  2. We have to actually act on it. It’s easy to say “you need to leave your job”, much harder to be the person that actually deals with the ramifications of that action.
  3. Fear. If we see the truth of our actions and vow to live in full alignment with our purpose, we have a lot more work to do.

 

How to cultivate that self-awareness:

  1. Talk with someone outside the situation. Working with a coach has been critical for my personal and professional development. By talking with someone completely removed from my situation, I’ve gotten an outsiders perspective and explain my thought process aloud – a very useful exercise.
  2. Indulge your vata. We’ve talked before about how following potential scenarios in your head can help you “try on” certain decisions without acting on them. If you did start that workout routine or quit that job or change cities…what could happen? What would be the pros and the cons? What barriers lie in your way? What could you learn? Does this choice remind you of something in your past, and what led to success or failure in that situation? Allow yourself to first imagine, so you can make the decision prepared and confident for what’s ahead.
  3. Know your strength. I’m currently reading “The Icarus Deception” by Seth Godin, and he tells an interesting story. Most of us are familiar with the story of Icarus – the boy who wanted to fly, so he built himself wings. Despite his father’s warning not to fly too close to the sun, Icarus gets greedy, does fly close to the sun, and then his wings melt and he falls to his death. The part that is not often told is that the father also warns Icarus not to fly too low. If he does so, his wings will get moist from the ocean and he will fail as well. We always worry about flying too high, but flying too low has it’s perils as well. You have the ability to soar, to get everything you want from life, and to excel. You are deserving of living a life that you love so completely and fully. How will you fly?

 

This week’s assignment:

Think of a time that you didn’t see a solution right in front of your face. What allowed your vision to clear? Is there something now you could use some more awareness on? Which of my 3 tips will you use to help you navigate ahead? Leave a comment below share your experience with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Join the Happy Healthy family to get special invites, event discounts, and lessons on living with intention.


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Super Healthy, Grain-Free Sweet Potato Pancake Recipe

Make this super healthy sweet potato pancake recipe for your next breakfast or brunch. They’re filling, decadent, and super healthy. High in protein, fiber, and vitamin A, they’ll keep you and your family happy and healthy through the fall and winter months

 

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If you’d let me, I’d eat breakfast 3 meals a day.

 

There are so many options! You can go sweet or savory, raw or cooked, light or more substantial.

 

Many of you have heard about the famous, two-ingredient pancakes which are getting rave reviews from readers around the country (and are basically the breakfast I make for any house guests or whenever I need to show gratitude to someone sharing their house with me).

 

But my sister’s latex allergy (which means she can’t have foods like bananas, mangos, and avocados), made me want to try out some banana-free pancakes.

 

While these super healthy sweet potato pancakes have more than 2 ingredients, they are still free of flour, grains, and can even be sugar free.

 

The banana egg pancakes have a light, tropical feel, but the sweet potato pancakes are perfect for the chillier fall and winter days ahead. If anything, they seem even more like regular pancakes than the banana pancakes do, so you can fool even the pickiest eaters in your house.

 

And since we’re such close friends, I’ll let you in on an amazing secret: pair the pancakes with a little maple syrup and pecan butter (we used handmade, but you can find great pecan butter from Big Spoon here). It is the most delicious combination, and you’ll almost feel bad about how delicious it is.

 

The nutrition

Let’s count up the score, shall we? We have:

-Gluten-free

-dairy-free

-refined sugar-free

-high protein

-make with whole foods

-high in fiber and vitamin A

-delicious

-easy

-store well!

 

Time to get cooking! 

 

Super Healthy Grain-Free Sweet Potato Pancakes
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Make these sweet potato pancakes for your next breakfast or brunch. They’re filling, decadent, and super healthy. High in protein, fiber, and vitamin A, they’ll keep you and your family happy and healthy through the fall and winter months!
Author:
Serves: 2 as a full breakfast
Ingredients
  • 1 ½ cups cooked sweet potato
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ginger
  • Coconut oil (for pan)
  • 1 tsp honey (optional)
  • Almond, peanut, or sunflower seed butter (for dipping, optional)
  • Maple syrup (for dipping, optional)
  • Jam (for dipping, optional)
Instructions
  1. Combine the sweet potato, eggs, chia, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and honey (if using) in a blender and blend until combined and smooth. (If your batter is too thick, just add a few tablespoons of water and blend!)
  2. Preheat your skillet to medium/high heat with coconut oil.
  3. Spoon out the batter onto the skillet – about 2 tbsp for each pancake (works best if the pancakes are about 3 inches in diameter).
  4. When the bottoms of the pancakes begin to solidify and turn brown, flip the pancakes over.
  5. Cook until browned on the bottom (you want them to still be fluffy and slightly squishy through the middle.)
  6. Keep warm until serving.
  7. When serving, top with nut butter and a bit of jam or maple syrup

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Join the Happy Healthy family to get special invites, event discounts, and lessons on living with intention.

 


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