Is it true?

When you’re upset with a situation or someone around you – ask yourself: is it true? You might just find that your brain (read: ego) is creating stories, rather than truly understanding what’s going on.

 
This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!
 

“I saw it with my own eyes.” That’s the ultimate measure of truth, right?

We rely on our senses to tell us what’s happening around us. But we often forget that there’s actually two steps in that process: First we see something, and then our brain interprets our vision.

In yoga philosophy, they talk about “perception” and “right perception”.

The first perception is that which you see, smell, hear, taste or touch. You sense something and make a judgment about it. For example, you hear a siren and assume that there is a fire across town. Or you taste a dish and decide that there must be lemon in it.

But then there’s right perception: the absolute truth. Right perception is the fact that the siren was actually because of a cat caught in a tree. Or that the lemon flavor was actually lemon thyme (a pretty fabulous herb that actually tastes just like lemon juice).

These are some pretty innocuous examples, but this distinction is incredibly important when thinking about situations that bring us stress, frustration, sadness, and anger.

Think about it: someone cuts you off when you’re driving. “Oh, that guy. He was probably looking at his phone and wasn’t caring about the people around him.”

Your partner doesn’t pick up your repeated calls. “Why doesn’t she care about me?”

These distressing thoughts cause pain and hurt that can last hours or even days.

What if the guy cut you off because he just found out his wife was going into labor?

What if your partner didn’t answer the calls because her battery died while in a long meeting?

Our brains assess, judge, and compartmentalize. We take in all of the information and then come to the best conclusion we can. But those conclusions are not always right.

The good news is that we can leverage this information to boost our happiness.

Here’s what you do:

In a situation that’s causing you stress, ask yourself “do I know that this is true?” Tell the story only with the guaranteed truth (for example, “the person cut me off”, or “my partner hasn’t picked up her phone in 2 hours.”) Explore possible reasons that this could happen, including the possible reasons that would make this a not stressful situation. Then, decide how it would be best to find out the objective truth, or if there’s anything you need to do at this time.

This week’s assignment:

Think of a stressful situation from the last week. What was the source of the stress? Was it the actual situation or your assessment of the situation? What would the situation have been without that stress-filled assessment? You can share your experience in the comments below or with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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How new habits form

Save yourself time and frustration: learn how to break bad habits and to form new habits!

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

 

When you were born, you had about 86 billion neurons. That’s 86 billion nodes by which electrical signals (i.e., conscious and subconscious thought) could be transferred. Each day, signals get sent in particular directions, controlling your speech, your hand-eye coordination, your musicality…and just about everything else in your body.

 

As you repeat specific actions or patterns, like throwing a ball, or saying your name, the connections get stronger. It’s like a path in the middle of the woods: as you tread through the same routes over and over, they get more defined and distinct.

 

At the same time, your brain is pruning other connections that it’s deemed you don’t need. It’s in this period where things haven’t been pruned so much that makes kids so great at picking up new skills, like speaking a second language. They have so many connections in their brain that learning happens better and faster than it does in adults.

 

Why the brain lesson?

If you’re a longtime reader of this newsletter, you know that we talk a lot about habits. Habits are essentially those well-worn paths in our brains. We perform these actions automatically and without too much effort.

 

If you’re trying to change a habit, learn something new, or react differently in specific situations, it’s like you’re walking through a vast forest. You might make your way through it, but it’s dark, full of branches, and difficult to find your way.

 

The second time you find yourself there, you recognize a tree or two. You remember where that particularly treacherous ditch was.

 

The third time, you take a quicker pace. You start to leave markers that tell you which direction to go and which paths to avoid.

 

Each time gets easier and easier, you get faster and faster, and that path becomes more well worn.

 

Understanding this is key to forming new habits and breaking bad ones.

 

We want instant results.

We think that when it takes us a long time to learn something that we’re dumb.

We feel that if we’re 100% consistent with our new habits, we lack motivation or are otherwise deficient.

 

In truth? We’re playing out our biology. We’re foraging through paths unknown. And while the forest is dark, we’re building signposts to make a brighter future possible.

 

When you embark on a new habit, I ask you to have compassion for your brain that is trying to make a journey through a dark forest. I ask you to keep trying again and again to build the new habit. Know that you are laying down the foundations for a clear path, and help you brain out by removing yourself from situations or placing yourself in situations that make success easier.

 

Your assignment:

Think back to a habit you’ve tried to give up or change in recent months. What was the process like? Did it get easier over time? What can you learn about your experience for another habit that you’d like to change? You can share your experience in the comments below or with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook group. Your experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!

samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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WeLive Spiralized Zucchini and Basil Omelet

This spiralized zucchini and basil omelet is the perfect veggie-filled addition to your brunch or weeknight dinner. It’s high in protein and super filling.

 

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

 

It’s time for another recipe from my cooking class at WeLive. If you’re unfamiliar with WeLive and are curious why an apartment building is holding biweekly cooking classes for their residents, read my previous post all about it here.

 

welive logo photo

 

 

At my cooking class, we served this omelet with a kale salad and roasted sweet potato fries to make a complete, delicious meal.

 

Don’t have a spiralizer? No problem. Simply cut the zucchini into 1/2 inch slices, and it will still taste delicious!

welive buddha photo 2

 

 

When you make this recipe – make sure to take a photo and tag @happyhealthysam so I can see your amazing meal!

 

Spiralized Zucchini and Basil Omelet
 
Cook time
Total time
 
This spiralized zucchini and basil omelet is the perfect veggie-filled addition to your brunch or weeknight dinner. It’s high in protein and super filling.
Author:
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 zucchini
  • 1 handful basil leaves
  • 2 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • Olive oil
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • salt
  • pepper
Instructions
  1. Dice ½ onion and sauté on medium heat with olive oil in a pan until translucent.
  2. Spiralize zucchini and add to the onion, salting the zucchini.
  3. Crack eggs and mix in a large bowl. Add chopped basil, salt, and pepper.
  4. Pour eggs over the zucchini and cook in a covered skillet until eggs are just set.
  5. Remove from the pan and place on a serving dish.

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

2016-07-15_07.54.46

Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Can you be too grateful?

Feeling like you don’t deserve all that’s being given to you? It’s possible to feel too grateful, leading to low self-esteem. Learn how to overcome the too grateful trap in this post.

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend! 

 

 

Today’s message is simple, and comes from a conversation I had with a client last week.

 

The Situation

She’s in the midst of entering into a new business partnership, and she expressed some fear. Amidst her excitement about the potential gains from the relationship, she also found herself wondering “what if they decide they want to back out? What if they’re unhappy with my work? Why are they spending this time working with me, when they could be working with better, more experienced people?”

 

This feeling of “not enough” isn’t just in business partnerships. It can show up in a new job, when working with a doctor or other professional, or in romantic relationships.

 

We’re reminded on a daily basis to express gratitude. We’re told we need to appreciate the situations and people around us.

 

But gratitude can be taken too far. When we find ourselves overly grateful, we’re actually denying some of our power.

 
We forget that in any relationship, personal or professional, both parties are there of their own free will. The other person or group benefits from the relationship, just like you.

 

As a result, you end up denying your full independence in the relationship.You make concessions you wouldn’t dream of doing otherwise. You don’t express your true needs and desires, for fear that the other party won’t approve.

 

Ultimately, it just leads to being burnt out, depressed, and unfulfilled by the relationship you were once so grateful for.

 

A new way:

 

Instead of feeling overly grateful for your new boss, recognize that you are an awesome worker that will be helping her out as well.

 

When you want to bring an extra presents for your friend – ask yourself why you’re doing it. Is it because you genuinely saw these gifts and knew they’d be perfect for him, or are you trying to “earn your keep”?

 

Remind yourself that you’re not the only lucky one. The other person is pretty damn lucky to be with you as well. Act from this place, and watch your relationships grow stronger, more secure, and be that much more satisfying.

 

Your Assignment:

What relationship in your life do you find yourself being grateful to the extreme? What benefit is the other party getting out of the relationship? Email me and let me know!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Simple Homemade Hummus Recipe

This simple homemade hummus is easy to make and is the perfect accompaniment for your lunch box, with carrot sticks, or at your next party. It’s high in protein, contains healthy olive oil and parsley, and tastes delicious!

 

Simple homemade hummus recipe photo

 

What recipe do I probably get the most use out of in my life?

Hummus.

I make my hummus recipe during Sunday meal prep for lunches and afternoon snacks, use it as a protein source in collard wraps and burritos, and bring it out as a dip when I have people over for parties.

Inevitably at these parties, people are amazed at just how great homemade hummus tastes when compared to the usual dip you pick up at the store. It’s amazing just how much flavor it has when compared to what you buy in the store.

Homemade hummus has a few other added benefits:

-no weird ingredients or preservatives

-no random vegetable oils

-cheaper than buying hummus

-super easy to make!

So today on the blog I’m letting my biggest party trick out for all of you. Enjoy!

When you make this recipe – make sure to take a photo and tag @happyhealthysam so I can see your amazing meal!

Simple Homemade Hummus
 
Cook time
Total time
 
This simple homemade hummus is easy to make and is the perfect accompaniment for your lunch box, with carrot sticks, or at your next party. It’s high in protein, contains healthy olive oil and parsley, and tastes delicious!
Author:
Serves: 608
Ingredients
  • 2 cans chickpeas
  • 2 tbsp tahini (unsalted)
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp chopped parsley (or more!)
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a food processor or blender.
  2. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary.
  3. Refrigerate before serving.

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

2016-07-15_07.54.46

Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Is that opinion needed?

Is someone’s opinion needed, and can you just make the decision yourself? Today’s article post details the subtle ways we undermine our own confidence by ignoring our own expertise.

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend! 

 

The background

I’m often asked why I decided to become a coach. I started my career in public health, so why did I start to work with individuals instead? If I wanted to change the world through better health and nutrition, why focus on individuals, when there is potentially great reach by focusing on the population?

 

The main reason is because I saw the power of coaching in my own life.When I was a PhD student at UNC, I started working with a career coach. And that decision completely changed the trajectory of not only my career, but also my life.

 

Amazingly (to those that know me now), I started working with my coach because I wanted to decide whether to focus my public health nutrition career on international or US-based nutrition. After 8 months of coaching, I launched a website, signed up for yoga teacher training, and started working with my first client. 16 months after that, I completed my PhD and moved to Washington, DC to take my business full time.

 

All of this happened because of one huge shift that my coach and I worked together on: I learned to trust myself.

 

Instead of questioning every decision, writing long, detailed pro-con lists, or consistently saying “I don’t know what I want!”, I started focusing on what it is that I did want. I learned that I was actually pretty darn good at making decisions, and had the power to make them myself.

 

That change allowed me to get real about what I wanted from my personal and professional life. Yoga taught me that my muscles and body are stronger than I think. But this work made me realize that my emotional fortitude was just as strong.

 

The premise

My coach and I were talking the past week about trust once again. Specifically, I was asking whether there was a good time and place for venting your feelings when in the midst of making a decision. I was thinking it could be useful to talk out the different sides of an issue with someone.

 

“Why do you need to do that? What does it give you?” She asked.

 

And then I realized: All it gives is validation. It can artificially put your fears to rest. It can stop you from doing what you’re scared to do, and it shows you what’s right for that person, not what’s right for you.

 

“People talk too much.” She continued. “All that talking shows you is that you aren’t trusting yourself to make the decision yourself.”

 

Cue brain explosion/light going off.

 

The insight

I thought “trusting myself” meant making decisions on my own. But it also means that you don’t need other people’s opinions about those decisions, even if you ultimately make them yourself.

 

Now of course – if it’s a medical decision, a legal issue, or you’re working with a plumber – by all means, get their opinion. They have true expertise that you don’t have and don’t need to have.

 

But when it comes to your schedule, a shirt you’re going to buy, what you’ll order, or what job you should take…who truly knows the answer better thank you do?

 

The easiest way to notice this phenomenon at work is to actually see it in other people. Look at the conversations you’re having, and notice how many times people are seeking opinions from everyone around them.

 

Then, start to watch your own speech. When are you simply sharing information, and when are you seeking validation or advice? Can you retreat from those conversations and find your own answers? Notice how satisfying it is to decide for yourself.

 

Put it into practice

What’s a decision you’re trying to make that has you wanting to seek advice and conversation from people around you? If that person was not available to talk to…what would your decision be? That might be the exact answer that you need.

 

Leave a comment below to let me know what decision it is you just made on your own. I can’t wait to hear and celebrate with you.

 

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

2016-07-15_07.54.46

Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Make a better to-do list

Check out these tips to clear up your to-do list and be satisfied with your days work!

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!


 
 

Life moves pretty fast. Between careers, families, friends, communities, all of can claim we have “busy” lives. But do we use busy as an excuse for not returning a phone call, for why we were a little short with our spouses, or for furrowing our brow and plowing through a checklist of tasks?

 

I’ll let you in on a little secret: you will always be busy, and the checklist is neverending. This became very apparent to me this past week when I finally made it to the holy grail of internet productivity: inbox zero. I felt so clean. So shiny and new.
 
But even as I was admiring my work – *bing!* – another email.
 
And then another.
 
Sure, it will be easier to maintain a clear inbox starting from zero instead of 500. However, the fact remains that if I became attached to the feeling of inbox zero, I could spend a lot of energy trying to achieve that simple goal, rather than thinking about the purpose behind inbox zero: actually responding and engaging with my friends and family.
 

The same can be said about our daily health practices – those little things we do every day to maintain our health and feel our best. Getting enough sleep. Eating an extra serving of vegetables. Going for that run. Taking quiet time. It’s easy to breeze through these tasks, thinking that by checking them off our list, we’ve achieved them and we’ve been successful.

 
But the truth is – checking these things off our list are hollow victories if we don’t actually take the time to notice what we are doing, and why we are doing it.

 
A 20-minute run spent worrying about a tomorrow’s deadline is much less therapeutic than a run spent simply enjoying your run.
 
Your could pass the time instead by noticing how great it is to be out with your dog, or amazing at the fact that you go 2.5 miles in the time it used to take you to go 2. I can guarantee you that you’ll feel differently at the end of the run based on your mindstate during it.
 
I should mention now that I have not mastered being mindful of my daily health practices. I realized this week that I was breezing through the things I love, simply to get them checked off a list, and as a result – the satisfaction was just not there. Don’t turn tasks that should build you up and refresh your energy into tasks that drain you and feel tiring instead.
 

So how can you find more meaning in your checklist this week? Here’s my most important tip.

  1. Write out everything you have to do today.
  2. Next to each item, write down the purpose for all of the items. Why does each item appear? What does it give you?
  3. Cross off all the items that either don’t have to get done today, or don’t bring you direct positive benefit (you’ll probably get rid of 50% or more).
  4. For everything let on your list, name one reason you’re grateful that it’s on your list. For example, if you have to go to the vet, be grateful that you have a delightful dog or cat in your life. If you’re cleaning your kitchen, gratitude for your amazing friends and dinner party you had last weekend.

 
With your abbreviated list – smile. You’ll go through your day with intentionality and the knowledge that you’re a damn lucky human being.

 
 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend!


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

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Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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Be like the energizer bunny

 

Want to increase your energy? Read below for a simple exercise that will help you identify what activities and habits you can include in your day to feel refreshed and ready to take on your day!

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend! 

 

The situation:

How does this compare to your normal day?

Wake up, get the kids ready for school, sip down a quick breakfast, rush to work, do that work all day, rush home, take care of errands or kids, maybe fit in a quick workout, watch an hour of television and then fall into bed. Rinse and repeat.

Probably sounds pretty familiar.

In that routine, I see a lot of energy out, and not a whole lot of energy in.

 

I had a client asked me recently “what is me-time?”, and I realized that our national energy deficit is pretty serious.

 

Unfortunately, this constantly drained energy also manifests in fatigue and disease.

 

As a natural giver, I understand what you’re doing. You want to support your aging parents, your growing kids, and be the best boss you can be. You’re checking off all of the boxes for others, but unfortunately not the ones for yourself.

 

Laws governing energy:

If you’ll let me channel my former life as a chemical engineer, I believe that the secret to energy management relates to the First Law of Thermodynamics:

 

Energy is not created or destroyed, only transferred.

 

That means that if you want to have an energy reserve in your body, you have to be putting more in than you’re taking out.

 

If you’re not consistently making deposits in the energy bank, you’re going to run out real quick.

 

My hypothesis about increasing energy:

 

One thing that I’ve been realizing lately is that refreshing your energy takes a lot of intention. Sure, you might be going to yoga a few times a week or turning off your work email on the weekends, but is it done with clear intention of refreshing your energy?

 

I was working with one of my own coaches recently, and he said he devotes time to reading, learning, and decompressing because “I have to grow and advance as much or faster than my clients.” Similarly, as my yoga teaching and coaching load has grown, I’ve found that I need to spend more time reading, practicing yoga, being quiet, and investing in myself, and being intentional about these activities.

 

What’s your first reaction to this? For many people – the first impulse is “but I don’t have time!” In actuality, the barrier most of us are facing is that we don’t know what to do in order to refresh our energy.

 

Gaining energy is about more than time. It’s about knowing what to do in the first place.

 

If you feel tired, overwhelmed, or stressed more than you’d like to admit, take out a journal or a fresh word document, and check out this week’s assignment.

 

Your assignment to help you increase energy:

Here are a few questions to help you figure out what would be count as an energy deposit in your life:

  1. What activities/situations bring a smile to your face?
  2. What are you always glad you did after you finish?
  3. What is a simple hobby/activity you enjoyed as a child?
  4. What is a simple hobby/activity you enjoyed as a young adult?
  5. What physical movement (dance, walking, yoga, boxing, soccer) brings you happiness?
  6. What things do you currently do just out of enjoyment?
  7. What makes you laugh most?

 

At this stage of the game, don’t worry about when, how, where. Start with pinning down those activities that really light you up. Notice any patterns that show up, or any activities you’ve forgotten about or let go.

 

Send me an email (sam[at]behappyhealthyhuman[dot]com) or leave a comment below to tell me what activities and situations are most likely to give you more energy in your day. 

 

You can also share your experience with other members of our Happy Healthy Human community in our private Facebook groupYour experience might bring you or someone else exactly the inspiration needed to take the next step. Thank you for sharing!

 

In my next post, we’ll dive in to how to actually fit these activities into your day, so that you can actually make these deposits in your energy bank, and be even more present and loving for your family.

 

This post originally appeared in my weekly newsletter – a Sunday morning email that shares mindful moments, health tips, and interesting news to make you smile. Sign up to receive yours, and be sure to share with a friend! 

 

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

2016-07-15_07.54.46

Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!


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WeLive Buddha Bowl with massaged kale and tahini dressing

Try this Buddha bowl with massaged kale and tahini dressing for a quick and easy weeknight dinner. It’s also the perfect party food!

 

Buddha bowl with massaged kale and tahini dressing photo

 

Eating is a social act. Whether it’s gathering your family around the table for the holidays, a birthday dinner, or a simple dinner party, meals are meant to be made and eaten together.

 

At WeLive, they’re expanding the family and friends community to include your neighbors.

 

WeLive is the housing arm of WeWork, the worldwide co-working space where I teach yoga and house my coaching business.

 

WeWork has been the foundation of my community since moving to Washington, D.C. one year ago. I met my boyfriend through WeWork, many of my friends work there, and I had multiple clients and collaborating partners from around the world because of their awesome network.

 

welive logo photo

WeLive has apartment buildings in the DC area (Crystal City, Arlington to be exact) and in NYC. Their furnished apartments and large communal spaces facilitate community and togetherness. There are constantly new events for their tenants – some educational, some wellness related (including my yoga classes), and others that are just plain fun (cocktail making class or Crab Fest, anyone?)

 

Healthy Cooking Classes at WeLive

But we all know that the kitchen is at the center of community (and critical for health). So the awesome community manager Alissa and I devised a plan for a healthy cooking class.

 

Monthly, me and 10 WeLivers (as I like to call them) cook and eat a healthy meal together. We want recipes that are easy for novice cooks, nutrition packed, and most importantly, delicious. I knew that Buddha Bowls had to be our first recipe.

welive buddha photo 2

 

What’s a Buddha Bowl?

Buddha bowls get their name because of their shape – they’re a bowl filled up with a hodge podge of vegetables, grains, beans, meat….any delicious, whole, unprocessed food. You fill up the bowl so much, it looks like the Buddha’s belly!

 

Most importantly, Buddha bowls are insanely easy to make and lend themselves well to pre-prepared food. You can use a combination of raw, cooked, and bought foods to mix and match all week.

 

Buddha Bowl with massaged kale and tahini dressing

This Buddha bowl with massaged kale and tahini dressing l is a particularly lovely combination.

 

Here’s what’s in it:

  • Quinoa and roasted chickpeas add protein
  • roasted carrots add a deep, sweet flavor, plus plenty of beta carotene
  • cucumbers and peppers add a fresh veggie crunch!
  • massaged kale to add a powerful, folate and vitamin K-filled bunch of leafy greens
  • tahini turmeric dressing that is anti-inflammatory and filling

 

Why Massaged Kale?

Kale is famous for it’s health and not it’s taste. Luckily, it’s super delicious when it’s prepared correctly.

 

Massage your kale with olive oil and salt (seriously, get in there and play with your food!) It softens up the tough fibrous parts and makes the kale delicious and easy to eat.

 

welive buddha photo 3

 

Making the Buddha Bowl

Making this with the WeLivers was a huge success. We had people in charge of each aspect of the Buddha bowl, leaders in charge of the cooking timers, and we all became kale massaging masters.

 

The best part of the evening was when the cooking was done, and everyone got to eating. We had a communal table, and were able to chat, and just spend time together.

 

That is the power of food. That is the beauty of WeLive. I’m proud to be a part of it!

 

When you make this recipe – make sure to take a photo and tag @happyhealthysam so I can see your amazing meal!

Buddha Bowl with Massaged Kale and Tahini Dressing
 
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Have an indulgent breakfast treat that's still good for you! This scone/muffin hybrid is gluten-free, vegan, and high in protein so you can have an energy-filled day. WIth a quick, homemade jam, you can get all the benefits of a breakfast pastry from delicious, whole-food ingredients.
Author:
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • ½ cup cooked quinoa
  • ½ cup Roasted Chickpeas
  • ½ avocado Avocados
  • 2 Roasted carrot
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1 bell pepper
  • 4 cups kale
  • 2 tbsp pumpkin seeds toasted
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • 3 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • salt
  • pepper
Instructions
  1. Rinse quinoa and cook in water over medium high height until softened (~20 minutes)
  2. On a large skillet, place canned chickpeas, salt, ~1/2 tbsp olive oil, pepper, and cayenne pepper. Roast at medium-high heat for ~10 minutes until slightly crispy and brown.
  3. Roast carrots (cut lengthwise and then into 4ths) at 425F for ~20 minutes on a baking sheet with 1 tbsp olive oil, salt, and pepper.
  4. Slice up cucumbers, bell pepper and avocado.
  5. Massage kale with a small amount of olive oil and salt.
  6. Gently toast pumpkin seeds on a skillet until slightly browned (~5 min)
  7. Combine tahini, turmeric, cayenne, lemon juice, and water, mixing until smooth. Add salt to taste.
  8. Assemble your bowl and drizzle with dressing!

 

  Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day,   samantha attard sig

 


samantha attard happy healthy humanSamantha Attard, PhD, is the founder of Happy Healthy Human. Sam is a performance coach, yoga instructor, and makes delicious snacks to help you eat with intention. Learn more here.

 

Healthy Carbs Cheat Sheet

2016-07-15_07.54.46

Get the guidelines on good vs bad carbs, including a sample day's meal plan!

 


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